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2 edition of Stolon effects on growth and development of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) nodal cuttings found in the catalog.

Stolon effects on growth and development of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) nodal cuttings

Joyce Ann Thompson

Stolon effects on growth and development of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) nodal cuttings

by Joyce Ann Thompson

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Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Potatoes -- Sprouting.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Joyce Ann Thompson.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination51 leaves, bound ;
    Number of Pages51
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15184346M

    Plant lipoxygenases (LOXs) are a functionally diverse class of dioxygenases implicated in physiological processes such as growth, senescence, and stress-related responses. LOXs incorporate oxygen into their fatty acid substrates and produce hydroperoxide fatty acids that are precursors of jasmonic acid and related compounds. Here, we report the involvement of the tuber-associated LOXs. The presence of the ipt gene in transgenic potato plants was confirmed by Southern hybridization. Shoot morphology was normal in nearly all transgenic plants prior to and after tuberization. Transgenic plants had extensive stolon growth and an increased number of tubers.

    Potato crop is the fourth main food crops in the world after maize, rice and wheat. It is characterized by specific temperature requirements and develops best at about 20°C. Forecasts of global warming prompt us to study the tolerance of potato genotypes to heat during the growing season. The aim of this work was to assess the response of chosen potato cultivars to high temperature during the. Tuber MeSH the potato tuber is an enlarged portion of an underground In contrast to the widespread misconception, potato tubers do not develop from roots but are, in fact, underground stems. Tuber eye The buds from which next season's growth will emerge. Eyes are concentrated near the apical end of the tuber, with fewer near the stolon or basal.

    Potato plants are herbaceous perennials that grow about 60 cm (24 in) high, depending on variety, with the leaves dying back after flowering, fruiting and tuber formation. They bear white, pink, red, blue, or purple flowers with yellow general, the tubers of varieties with white flowers have white skins, while those of varieties with colored flowers tend to have pinkish skins. Getting potato plants to emerge quickly in the spring is key to minimizing damage to shoot and stolon cankers because plants are more susceptible before emergence. Planting seed tubers in warm soil and covering them with as little soil as possible will speed the emergence of the shoots and increase resistance to canker infection.


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Stolon effects on growth and development of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) nodal cuttings by Joyce Ann Thompson Download PDF EPUB FB2

Effects of shoot, root and stolon temperature on the development of the potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) plant. Development of the haulm. Epstein, E., Effect of soil temperature at different growth stages on growth and development of potato Cited by: Given the effects of temperature on the structure of the stolon system, and thus on the number of potential sites for tuberization, and given the effect of temperature on the size of the shoot system at first tuber initiation, tuber number may be enhanced by an increase in temperature even though tuber growth may be slowed down.

In potato (Solanum tuberosum), tubers develop from underground stolons, diageotropic stems which originate from basal stem nodes. As the degree of stolon branching influences the number and size distribution of tubers, it was considered timely to investigate the effects of SL production on potato development and tuber life by: The role of indole acetic acid (IAA) in stolon development appears to be related to its effects on apical dominance.

It is shown that application of the cytokinins, kinetin and benzylamino purine. Early stolon formation\ud decreased transplant height but, as potato plants matured, treatment\ud effects on vine length became negligible.

Dry weight of mature top\ud growth was not affected by early stolon formation. Potato tuber initiation and its growth are key processes determining tuber yield, which are closely related to stolon growth, and are influenced by many factors including N nutrition.

The stolon tips are the underground stems and most of the potato mass lies 18 to 24 inches below the soil surface. The shallow location of the tubers means that sufficient water is very important.

As the degree of stolon branching influences the number and size distribution of tubers, it was considered timely to investigate the effects of SL produc- tion on potato development and tuber life cycle.

Transgenic potato plants were generated in which the CAROTENOID CLEAVAGE. Purchase Potato Physiology - 1st Edition. Print Book & E-Book. ISBNText node here in '{0}'. Tuberization of Stolon Tips and Development of Tubers Environmental Effects on Growth and Development of Potato Plants I.

Introduction. Plant growth stages of Russet Burbank potato. Stage IPlant development after planting and until tuber initiation. Stage IIBegins with initiation of tubers at the tips of stolons (tuberization) approximately 10 to 14 days prior to ization is defined as an enlargement which is double the normal stolon.

The cultivars Bintje and Désirée were growth with their shoots, roots and stolons at different temperatures, to study the effects on tuber development. More tuber sites were initiated in ‘Bintje’ when the air, root or stolon temperature was increased but a combined increase of air and root temperature greatly reduced the number of sites.

Table 4 summarizes the effects of low and high soil moisture during tuber bulking and (Erwinia carotovora), and stem and stolon canker (Rhizoctonia solani). Excess moisture will also decrease tuber respiration, putting the seed-piece under metabolic stress.

The effect of water stress on potato growth, development, and yield. Am Potato J. Stolon effects on growth and development of potato The effects of early stolon formation on Russet Burbank transplants were studied using transplants with stolons present, stolons absent, and stolons removed.

Field studies revealed no significant treatment effects on total yield, number of tubers per plant, weight per tuber or numbers of. The effects of plant hormones and sucrose (Suc) on potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tuberization were studied using in vitro cultured single-node cuttings.

Tuber-inducing (high Suc) and -noninducing (low Suc or high Suc plus gibberellin [GA]) media were tested.

Tuberization frequencies, tuber widths, and stolon lengths were measured during successive stages of development. Assessment of auxin concentrations. Potato plants (S. tuberosum group andigena) were propagated in vitro and grown for weeks in MS20 before being transferred to soil-filled pots in the 9 weeks, the shoot apex, middle, and basal internode stem segments, the stolon region 1 cm below the apex [subswelling region (SSR)], and the stolon apical meristem (STAM) were harvested and.

The morphological growth characteristics of shoots, stolons, and tubers were measured on potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.) grown in irrigation and drought from plant cultivars with a wide range of seasonal maturing patterns, Chubaek (very early), Superior (medium-early), and Jayoung (late), were used.

- Stolon (vascular system) - Composition (cell size, no of starch granules, sugars, enzymes) - Age. How do we make the factory more productive.

Build it faster. Potato Growth Stages Reprinted from Potato Production Systems, University of ID Building the factory Effect on location on bulking rate 0 60 72 85 99 14 levels increase dramatically in the stolon prior to tuberization and remain relatively high during subsequent tuber growth, suggesting a promoting role for auxin in tuber formation.

Furthermore, in vitro tuberization experiments showed higher levels of tuber formation from axillary buds of. Genetic Effects. Effects of the Mother Tuber. Physiological Nature of Induction to Tuberize.

Changes in the Stolon Tip or Bud Associated with Tuberization. Patterns of Stolon and Tuber Formation. Resorption and Second Growth. Implications for Tuber Yield. Conclusion. Literature Cited. The effect of row width on the yield of three potato varieties - Volume 79 Issue 2 - E.

Allen. Included among the many signals that traffic through the sieve element system are full-length mRNAs that function to respond to the environment and to regulate development.

In potato, several mRNAs that encode transcription factors from the three-amino-loop-extension (TALE) superfamily move from leaves to roots and stolons via the phloem to control growth and signal the onset of tuber formation.Stolon formation occurs in both tuber-inducing and noninducing conditions; however, the angle and amount of stolon growth has been correlated with the strength of the inductive signal.

Very strong induction results in “sessile” tuber formation with no prior stolon growth (Fig. 2;. Potato. Potatoes produce a fibrous root system. As a result, potatoes are often unable to exploit nutrients and soil moisture at depth within a soil profile. While root growth occurs when soil temperatures are between 50 to 95˚F (10 to 35˚C), best, most active root development is at soil temperatures of between 59 and 68˚F (15 and 20˚C).